Life satisfaction of immigrants: does cultural assimilation matter?

Life satisfaction of immigrants: does cultural assimilation matter?

Life satisfaction of immigrants: does cultural assimilation matter?

Author(s)    Viola Angelini, Laura Casi, Luca Corazzini

 

When people migrate to a new country, they bring with them resources, habits, and experiences from their home country, including valuable productive inputs (e.g., labor, skills, other sources of human capital) that can generate substantial economic returns for the host country.

Yet, they also enter this new society with (potentially) different cultural backgrounds, marked by distinct languages, religions, and (economic and social) values.

Unfortunately, cultural exchanges triggered by migration flows sometimes are associated with dissimilation and segregation, which exert detrimental (social and economic) effects on both natives and immigrants.

 

To  investigate  empirically  the  association  between  a  direct  measure  of

assimilation with a host culture and immigrants’  subjective well-being, this study

uses data from the German Socio-Economic Panel.

A positive, significant association arises between cultural assimilation and immigrants’ life satisfaction, even after controlling for several potential confounding factors, such as immigrants’ individual (demographic  and  socio-economic)  characteristics  and  regional  controls  that  capture their external social conditions.

 

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